first_imgTNT big man Troy Rosario. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netTroy Rosario didn’t deny that he feels pressured playing alongside stars Jayson Castro and Ranidel de Ocampo.“I’m really pressured, especially when we’re on the court together. You must know what they’re doing because they’re better at reading the plays and have been in the league longer, so they really know what they’re doing.”ADVERTISEMENT Seeing his veteran teammates operate motivates Rosario to perform better, just like what he did on Friday as he waxed hot from three to help TNT KaTropa deliver the 109-100 win over Alaska.The former National U standout went on a barrage, going 6-of-9 from three to top his side with 25 points and six rebounds as the KaTropa improved to 4-2 and grabbed a share of second place.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliBut this game didn’t come from nowhere with Rosario trying his best to emulate the  work ethic of Castro and de Ocampo.“I watch what they’re doing in practice and why they’re doing that. That’s where I improve my game,” he said. As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town MOST READ EDITORS’ PICK PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Senators to proceed with review of VFA Banal brothers Gab, Ael relish first face off Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol towncenter_img Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH The sophomore also lauded the KaTropa’s resiliency, as the team constantly found a way to douse Alaska’s numerous fightbacks in the fourth quarter.“It’s good that we always had a response to Alaska’s runs. I’m also happy that us younger players are contributing to the veterans. Our blending has been good. I just take what the defense gives me, which is the same with what our system gives. If I’m open, I have a license to shoot those shots.”On a two-game win streak to end the year, Rosario is hopeful that TNT could build on this stretch heading into the new year.“I hope we become consistent. That’s what we’re thinking of for our next games. This is a big boost for us because the teams are very close to each other in the standings. One loss and you drop in the standings. At least next year, we have a one win advantage against our opponents.”ADVERTISEMENT Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine We are young View commentslast_img read more

first_imgArticle published by Willie Shubert Animals, Coastal Ecosystems, Herps, Insider, Reptiles Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Mongabay’s Director of Partnerships shares what inspired his love of nature.The Santa Monica Mountains, just north of Los Angeles, was the scene of Martin’s childhood search for snakes, lizards, skinks, salamanders, newts, frogs and turtles. Oh, and tarantulas and scorpions.This post is insider content, which is available to paying subscribers. I grew up in Southern California, just north of Los Angeles, and spent time in nature consistently throughout my childhood. I credit the under-the-radar natural wonderland of Southern California, as well my parents’ love of nature, thoughtfully instilled into me during hikes, camping and beach trips, as the foundational inspiration seeding my career as an… This content is for Monthly, Annual and Lifetime members only.Membership offers a way for readers to directly support Mongabay’s non-profit conservation news reporting, while getting a first-hand, behind-the-scenes look at what it takes to produce these stories. Every few weeks, we’ll publish a new member article that tells the story behind the reporting: the trials and tribulations of field reporting, personal travel accounts, photo essays, and more.You can sign up for membership Here If you’re already a member: Log InMembers getExclusive, behind-the-scenes articles.Access to our members-only newsletter.Access to periodic conversations with Mongabay journalists.last_img read more

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored The Brazilian Cerrado once covered two million square kilometers (772,204 square miles), an area bigger than Great Britain, France and Germany combined, to the east and south of the Amazon. But today, more than half its native vegetation is gone largely due to a boom in soy production – with the valuable beans exported to the EU and other nations.The Amazon Soy Moratorium, a voluntary agreement, while reducing soy-caused deforestation In the Amazon biome, resulted in intensified deforestation in the neighboring Cerrado savannah biome. And until recently, transnational commodities firms have resisted a similar deforestation agreement in the Cerrado.Now 6 commodities companies and members of the Soft Commodities Forum – Cargill, Bunge, Louis Dreyfus Company (LDC), Archer Daniels Midland (ADM), Glencore Agriculture, and COFCO International, a Chinese firm – have announced a new agreement to monitor soy supply chains in 25 Cerrado deforestation “high risk” municipalities.This new voluntary industry agreement, while a step forward, is seen as partial by critics. They say that more measures are needed to achieve zero forestation, stop farmworker exploitation, conserve land and water, and reduce over-usage of toxic pesticides. A view of the Cerrado savannah and plateau tablelands. Photo by Alicia Prager.In a step toward limiting the loss of Cerrado biome native vegetation, six major commodity traders have agreed on a common framework for monitoring soy supply chains in 25 deforestation “high risk” municipalities within the vast savannah – currently a hotspot for Brazilian deforestation.Members of the Soft Commodities Forum (SCF) – a global platform of leading commodity companies including Cargill, Bunge, Louis Dreyfus Company (LDC), Archer Daniels Midland (ADM), Glencore Agriculture, and COFCO International, a Chinese firm – have agreed to monitor and publish data concerning trading company soy supply chains from those Cerrado municipalities facing the “highest risk of conversion of native vegetation to soy,” according to an SCF statement. The Soft Commodities Forum is a subset of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD).The definition of what exactly “high risk” means, will be determined by the Cerrado Working Group (GTC), an entity comprised of the commodities industry, NGOs, producer organizations, Brazilian consumer goods companies, financial institutions and the government.“Sourcing in these municipalities will be reported in percentages of direct purchase from farmers, and indirect purchase from parties like aggregators, cooperatives and third parties,” a Cargill representative, told Mongabay. The first report by the SCF partnership will be published in June.The conversion of native vegetation to soy plantations is a leading cause of deforestation in the Amazon and Cerrado. Image by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.To start, the six companies are committed to monitoring supply chains in 25 Cerrado municipalities, says David Cleary, director of global agriculture at The Nature Conservancy (TNC), an NGO. TNC works with soy traders, helping them implement their deforestation commitments. The agreement is important, says Cleary, not least because it came through the SCF, which involves six major traders. “They have a significant weight on the market, it means a lot that they did this together, rather than on an individual basis,” he says.“The Soft Commodities Forum facilitates the first time leading global commodity traders are working together in a pre-competitive project to address sustainability risks they all share, but which no single company can resolve alone,” says Diane Holdorf, managing director for Food & Nature at WBCSD.However, many industry analyists, though pleased by this seeming progress, are reserving judgement on the agreement’s significance. It is too early to assess the announced measures properly, with much depending on the definition used to select “high risk” municipalities, explained Tiago Reis, a PhD researcher on agricultural supply chains at Université Catholique de Louvain: “The devil is in the details. But it looks like a step forward,” he said.A northern tiger cat (Leopardus Tigrinus). Though less well celebrated for its biodiversity than the Amazon, the Cerrado biome boasts more than 10,000 plant species and 300 mammal species. Photo credit: miguel vanegas on Visual Hunt / CC BY-NC-SAA biome in serious troubleThe Brazilian Cerrado once covered two million square kilometers (772,204 square miles), an area bigger than Great Britain, France and Germany combined, stretching to the east and south of the Amazon. But today, more than half its native vegetation is gone.The main driver of this destruction is the flourishing soy industry. The high demand by the European Union and other nations for the valuable bean has directly and indirectly led many producers to convert the Cerrado’s biodiversity-rich dry forests and bushland into vast soy plantations, sometimes crossing legal boundaries to do so. In recent months, the demand for Brazilian soy continued rising further, partly the result of the lingering US-China trade war.Conservation NGOs and scientists have been lobbying for a more comprehensive protection of the Cerrado for years now, and demanded a similar framework to the 2006 Soy Moratorium in the Amazon – a voluntary agreement by which transnational commodities companies such as Bunge, ADM, Cargill, and Amaggi, along with other actors, agreed not to source soy from newly deforested areas within Legal Amazonia.Studies suggest that the Amazon Soy Moratorium has been successful in keeping Amazon deforestation rates low, with the expansion of agriculture slowing down significantly following a peak in 2004. However, in contrast to the Amazon, where the moratorium was in place, conversion rates from native vegetation into pastures and soy plantations has increased dramatically in the so-called Matopiba region – a large section of the Cerrado biome comprised of Maranhão, Tocantins, Piauí, and Bahia states and an area characterized by extensive agricultural development.One recent study, in fact, suggests that the Amazon Soy Moratorium was partly to blame for the surge in soy production in the neighboring Cerado. Vivana Zalles, doctoral candidate at the Global Land Analysis and Discovery (GLAD) lab, has studied the “leakage” of deforestation from the Amazon to the less well protected Cerrado, a phenomena undervalued for a long time.Also undervalued until recently was the Cerrado’s carbon storage capacity. That’s because the savannah biome lacks the vast aboveground rainforests of the Amazon. Instead its plants grow largely downward into unseen but extensive root systems, “a forest upside down” that functions as an important carbon sink and curb against climate change. Further, the biome is home to more than 10,000 plant species, over 900 birds and 300 mammal species, all increasingly threatened if deforestation should continue at the present speed.More than half the Cerrado biome has already been lost to agribusiness. Image by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.East-West commodities firm alliance The new soy supply chain monitoring agreement is especially significant not only for what it could do, but because of one of its traders – COFCO International, a Chinese firm. Company CEO, Jun Lyu stressed the importance of fighting deforestation in Davos last year, and specifically talked about Cerrado conservation at the January 2019 conference.After those tantalizing public statements, environmentalists waited for actual commitments, which have now arrived with the SCF agreement: “It’s an historic development, as it’s the first time that a Chinese trader is coordinating with Western companies to promote sustainability,” Cleary states. This is especially key given China’s powerful and rapidly growing influence on the Brazilian agribusiness market.The agreement comes at a critical time, says Cleary, who points to current political developments in Brazil. During the last three months of the 2018 presidential election campaign, Amazon deforestation rates soared by nearly 50 percent, possibly as ruralistas – rural landowners and agricultural producers – anticipated policy changes under the presidency of rightist Jair Bolsonaro, who strongly favors agribusiness profits over environmental protections.With this new agreement, “Soy companies are sending a signal to Brazil” and its new government, says TNC’s Cleary. The commodities firms “are working in an [international] market where sustainability concerns are important, so they show with this measure where the market is going.”Fire and heavy equipment like that seen here are typically used to clear native vegetation, making way for soy which is exported to global markets. Image by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.Deforestation financial incentives neededCleary and others agree that it will likely be difficult to make a zero-deforestation commitment attractive to producers. That’s because achieving such a goal, in many cases, could require farmers to make greater deforestation commitments than those required by Brazil’s forest protection laws, which in turn might mean smaller profits.He says that in order to remedy this dilemma, traders are going to use the carrot not the stick, working closely with financial institutions to develop deforestation financial incentives for farmers. While current contracts are commonly signed from one harvest to the next, credit lines could become longer in the future, a benefit which farmers would appreciate.“We will see a lot of experiments with different measures in the next year. Traders will want to talk to banks and financial institutions to attract farmers to zero-conversion commitments,” says TNC’s Cleary. However, whether this will actually translate into less deforestation depends a lot on market developments.Fábio Pitta from the NGO Rede Social de Justiça e Direitos is sceptical, and has strong doubts as to the financial viability of zero deforestation. “Brazil is in [an economic] crisis right now and [the government is] weakening all kinds of protection laws to increase the profits of [agribusiness] enterprises,” he says, adding that deforestation and agricultural expansion are driven by the need to increase production in hard economic times, largely in order to be able to pay off debts.The new agreement and the incentives “are an important step, but difficult to trust,” Pitta concludes.The stereotypical image of the Cerrado is of endless grassland, but the biome also includes forest. Image by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.The key to protecting forests within commodity supply chains lies in transparency, says Reis. He calls the SCF announcement a cautious move, and urges a bolder initiative that would establish a non-secret paradigm for business information throughout the Cerrado and elsewhere. For the scientific community, the full disclosure of producer-commodity company purchasing data would offer a new possibility for analyzing and understanding the vulnerability of traders to deforestation.Until now, one of the most useful data sets to work with is the platform Trase, Reis says, a data base which allows interested parties to follow trade flow to identify sourcing regions, profile supply chain risks to the environment (such as deforestation), and to assess opportunities for sustainable production. TRASE is an initiative of the Stockholm Environment Institute and Global Canopy, two international NGOs.However, Trase, lacks pinpoint accuracy in some parts of the supply chain because it is built with the help of modelled projections because traders won’t disclose municipal level procurement data. “Trading companies protect their [producer] purchasing data all around the world and say it’s part of their [proprietary] core business,” says Reis. “All companies would have to disclose the information together to avoid [competitive] disadvantages. We need a bold industry move” to bring about that sort of wide ranging cooperation.The new SCF reporting measures in the Cerrado could be a kick-starter for just such a trend, say some experts.Isolete Wichinieski from Comissão Pastoral da Terra (CPT), a Catholic Church organization, warns that Cerrado conservation can’t only focus on “high risk” municipalities; it will demand many regionwide socio-environmental commitments. That’s why she is coordinating the Campaign in Defense of the Cerrado: “Barring deforestation is important, but measures are also needed to stop the exploitation of workers, land and water, as well as the usage of huge amounts of agrochemicals,” Wichinieski says.To develop and implement those sorts of sweeping strategies one can’t only rely on industry, she concludes. It will also call for the inclusion of the Cerrado’s traditional communities, who have protected the savannah and lived sustainably within the biome for more than a century.Banner image: A soy field, with forest in the distance. Image by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Land cleared for soy in Latin America. Image by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay. Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img Agriculture, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Industrial Agriculture, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Soy, Traditional People, Tropical Deforestation, Zero Deforestation Commitments last_img read more

first_imgActivism, Climate Change, Climate Change Politics, climate policy, Climate Politics, Energy, Environment, Environmental Politics, Governance, Impact Of Climate Change, Jeremy Hance Last year, Greta Thunberg kick-started a movement of youth striking on Fridays for climate action.The youth today, those born after 1995, are already telling us their generations’ name: Generation Climate.Generation Climate will experience the large-scale impact of global warming after 30 years of inaction.This post is part of “Saving Life on Earth: Words on the Wild”, a monthly column by Jeremy Hance, one of Mongabay’s original staff writers. On Friday March 15 — the Ides — tens-of-thousands of school-age kids around the world will go on strike from their education. It’s expected to be the biggest Friday Climate Strike yet, a movement started last year by Greta Thunberg in Stockholm, Sweden in a bid to get the adults of the world — us — to do something, anything, about the daily worsening climate crisis that will be our legacy to them: the now-coming-of-age, the Generation Climate.The growing youth of today, those born during the last 20 years or so, don’t have a name yet. They’ve been dubbed either Generation Z or iGen (apparently we’re now attempting to name whole generations after a product line), but they’re telling us a more apt name: Generation Climate.Surprisingly, there are no hard or fast rules about when a generation begins or ends, but generally speaking the post-millennial generation is usually set at beginning sometime between 1995 and 2000. Where it ends also remains up for debate. Maybe 2010? Or maybe it’s still going. But whatever years historians eventually land on, the post-millennials are the first full generation born into a world where climate catastrophe is already an established fact.School Strike for Climate, a.k.a. Fridays For Our Future, in front of Helsinki’s Parliament House in January. Photo by: Kaihsu Tai.By the time the first members of Generation Climate were born, not only was Hansen’s testimony old news, but the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) had already released two reports — one in 1990 and another in 1995 — detailing the basics of climate science and outlining, in the second report, “the potential for human activities to alter the Earth’s climate to an extent unprecedented in human history.”Generation Climate will spend the entirety of their adult lives in a world that is already 1 degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) warmer than it should be, and where carbon dioxide concentrations are outside any previous generations’ experience. In 2013, when Generation Climate ranged from toddler to 18, atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide hit 400 parts per million (ppm) for the first time since humans walked the Earth. Adam and Eve never saw a climate like this.Generation Climate will also experience the impacts of our inaction like none before them. Given that some of them will live to see the year 2100, this is the generation that could see the world’s coral reefs wiped off the face of the Earth, that could see an Arctic wholly free of ice and sea levels swallow islands and coastlines across the world. This is the generation that may see widespread famines due to agricultural failure and desertification. This is the generation that may see social and political upheaval from mass migrations, conflict, and societal breakdowns caused by a destabilized climate.None of this will be Generation Climate’s fault. They will be inheriting the world we have consciously created.We’ve now had the gift of more than 30 years to confront the climate crisis, thirty years and three generations of leaders: the Silent Generation, the Baby Boomers and most recently, Gen X. If the ultimate goal is to decrease global carbon emissions then you could argue we’ve achieved little to date. While we managed to level off global emissions for a few years, last year saw a new record high.In fact, one could argue that the leaders of these three generations, time and again, have actually heard the climate concerns and then done the exact opposite of what they should: opening up more areas to oil drilling, building more coal plants, throwing more tax dollars into fossil fuel subsidies. Leaders have time and again chosen deregulation when increased oversight was required and laissez-faire capitalism when what capitalism most needed a leash. Maybe a muzzle.Perhaps the most important measure to combat climate change has been the Paris Agreement. However, this agreement was never an end in itself, but only a beginning — in many ways the easy part. The hard part — the great transformation, nation by nation — still has to be done. And few nations appear serious yet about doing the heavy lifting.No matter what the next couple of decades hold — whether we finally get serious about solving the climate catastrophe or we continue to neglect our responsibilities — Generation Climate will face the consequences of 30 years of shirking. And their leaders will no longer have the luxury of turning away.As the students leave their backpacks at home and pick up their placards, as they fill the streets and chant for courage, remember they are standing up for their generation. For their future. They are telling us to stop turning aside. They are Generation Climate and we would do well to listen. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Jeremy Hancelast_img read more

first_imgAlternative Energy, Clean Energy, Climate Change, Climate Change and Dams, Dams, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Environment, Global Warming, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Renewable Energy, Research, Rivers, Tropical Rivers Article published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img In a comment article published in the Nature last month, scientists argue that an “energy future in which both people and rivers thrive” is possible with better planning.The hydropower development projects now underway threaten the world’s last free-flowing rivers, posing severe threats to local human communities and the species that call rivers home. A recent study found that just one-third of the world’s 242 largest rivers remain free-flowing.The benefits of better planning to meet increasing energy demands could be huge: A report released by WWF and The Nature Conservancy ahead of the World Hydropower Congress, held in Paris last month, finds that accelerating the deployment of non-hydropower renewable energy could prevent the fragmentation of nearly 165,000 kilometers (more than 102,500 miles) of river channels. In a comment article published in the Nature last month, scientists argue that an “energy future in which both people and rivers thrive” is possible with better planning.For decades, hydropower dams have been a go-to solution for electrifying the developing world. There are more than 60,000 large dams around the globe, and as the demand for clean energy in Africa, South America, and Southeast Asia continues to grow, hundreds more are currently in the planning stages.Hydroelectric dams have their advantages, such as providing a steady supply of baseload electricity that can be adjusted quickly to meet fluctuating demand and zero hazardous wastes or byproducts to dispose of. But according to the authors of the Nature article, led by Rafael J. P. Schmitt at Stanford University, “Hydropower needs to be viewed as part of a broader strategy for clean energy, in which the costs and benefits of different sources should be assessed and weighed against each other.”The hydropower development projects now underway threaten the world’s last free-flowing rivers, posing severe threats to local human communities and the species that call rivers home. The Cambodian government, for instance, is proposing to build the 2.6-gigawatt Sambor dam on the Mekong River, which “would prevent fish from migrating, threatening fisheries worth billions of dollars. It would further cut the supply of sediment to the Mekong Delta, where some of the region’s most fertile farmland is at risk of sinking below sea level by the end of the century,” according to Schmitt and colleagues. “And the dam would do little to bring electricity or jobs to local villagers: much of its hydropower would be exported to big cities in neighbouring nations, far from the rivers that will be affected.”A recent study found that just one-third of the world’s 242 largest rivers remain free-flowing, mostly in remote regions of the Amazon Basin, the Arctic, and the Congo Basin.As Schmitt and co-authors note in the Nature article, however, hydropower is just one of many clean energy options available today, and technologies like solar panels or wind turbines can produce similar amounts of electricity as large hydroelectric dams at roughly the same cost.“[S]preading a variety of renewable energy sources strategically across river basins could produce power reliably and cheaply while protecting these crucial rivers and their local communities,” the researchers write. “Solar, wind, microhydro and energy-storage technologies have caught up with large hydropower in price and effectiveness. Hundreds of small generators woven into a ‘smart grid’ (which automatically responds to changes in supply and demand) can outcompete a big dam.”Schmitt and team say that, in order to keep the world’s remaining free-flowing rivers unobstructed while increasing access to electricity in developing nations at the same time, strategies for deploying renewable energy technologies and expanding hydropower projects must be made at the basin-wide or regional level and strike the right balance between impacts and benefits of all available clean electricity generation methods. “On the major tributaries of the lower Mekong, for example, dams have been built ad hoc. Existing ones exploit only 50% of the tributaries’ potential hydropower yet prevent 90% of their sand load from reaching the delta,” the researchers report. “There was a better alternative: placing more small dams higher up the rivers could have released 70% of the power while trapping only 20% of the sand.”Site selection for solar and wind farms must be just as strategic as for new dams. “Impacts of these projects on the landscape need to be considered, too. Solar and wind farms might be built on patches of land that have low conservation value, such as along roads, or even floating on hydropower reservoirs,” Schmitt and co-authors suggest. “Solar panels and small wind turbines can be put on or near buildings to minimize infrastructure and reduce energy losses in transmission.”The scientists recommend that organizations and governments who manage river basins apply a “holistic perspective” to energy planning that takes into account all non-hydropower renewable energy options, energy efficiency measures, energy demand management, and the risks posed by global climate change — as decreasing river flows in a more drought-prone, warmer world could severely impact the output of hydroelectric dams.But in order to properly evaluate all of the trade-offs when designing a renewable energy strategy, we need to know much more about river ecosystems and the human communities that depend on them: “Researchers need to fill data gaps across whole river basins, from fish migration and sediment transport to community empowerment and impacts on food systems,” Schmitt and co-authors write. “The costs of lost ecosystem services over the life cycle of energy projects must be included in cost–benefit analyses. Such research is cheap compared with the costs of building dams and mitigating environmental impacts.”The benefits of better planning to meet increasing energy demands could be huge: A report released by WWF and The Nature Conservancy ahead of the World Hydropower Congress, held in Paris last month, finds that accelerating the deployment of non-hydropower renewable energy could prevent the fragmentation of nearly 165,000 kilometers (more than 102,500 miles) of river channels.“We can not only envision a future where electricity systems are accessible, affordable and powering economies with a mix of renewable energy, we can now build that future,” Jeff Opperman, a freshwater scientist with WWF and lead author of the report, said in a statement.“If we do not rapidly seize the opportunity to accelerate the renewable revolution, unnecessary, high-impact hydropower dams could still be built on iconic rivers such as the Mekong, Irrawaddy, and Amazon — and dozens or hundreds of others around the world. It would be a great tragedy if the full social and environmental benefits of the renewable revolution arrived just a few years too late to safeguard the world’s great rivers and all the diverse benefits they provide to people and nature.”Pamok, Laos. Life along the banks of the Mekong River. © Nicolas Axelrod / Ruom for WWF.CORRECTION: This article originally misstated the generating capacity of the Sambor dam. It is 2.6 gigawatts. Mongabay regrets the error.CITATIONS• Grill et al. (2019). Mapping the world’s free-flowing rivers. Nature. doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1111-9• Opperman, J., J. Hartmann, M. Lambrides, J.P. Carvallo, E. Chapin, S. Baruch-Mordo, B. Eyler, M. Goichot, J. Harou, J. Hepp, D. Kammen, J. Kiesecker, A. Newsock, R. Schmitt, M. Thieme, A. Wang, and C. Weber. (2019). Connected and flowing: a renewable future for rivers, climate and people. WWF and The Nature Conservancy, Washington, DC.• Schmitt, R. J., Kittner, N., Kondolf, G. M., & Kammen, D. M. (2019). Deploy diverse renewables to save tropical rivers. Nature 569, 330-332. doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01498-8FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more